Science. Music. More languages than are really necessary. Ranting. Also cats and self-deprecation.

 

spacettf:

Skylab, 1973-1979 by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.Tramite Flickr:
Image Credit: NASA
Skylab from above. Launched on March 14, 1973 Skylab was America’s first experimental space station.
Orbiting the Earth from 1973 to 1979 Skylab contained solar arrays, an observatory, laboratory, workshop and other systems.
Skylab allowed humans to remain in orbit for longer than ever before and numerous studies of the sun and Earth’s atmosphere were conducted from there.

spacettf:

Skylab, 1973-1979 by NASA on The Commons on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Image Credit: NASA

Skylab from above. Launched on March 14, 1973 Skylab was America’s first experimental space station.

Orbiting the Earth from 1973 to 1979 Skylab contained solar arrays, an observatory, laboratory, workshop and other systems.

Skylab allowed humans to remain in orbit for longer than ever before and numerous studies of the sun and Earth’s atmosphere were conducted from there.

levantineviper-archive:

The Lagoon Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius 
Image credit: NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

levantineviper-archive:

The Lagoon Nebula in the constellation Sagittarius 

Image credit: NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope

for-all-mankind:

explorationimages:

Mars Express:  The Earth from Mars orbit, taken with the probe’s Visual Monitoring Camera (aka the “Mars Webcam”).  The camera is a simple low-resolution device, without a shade to cut down sun glare, and the result isn’t exactly a National Geographic cover photo.  But still, it’s the Earth from Mars.  That never stops being cool.

Our planet from another planet. That never ceases to excite me.

for-all-mankind:

explorationimages:

Mars Express: The Earth from Mars orbit, taken with the probe’s Visual Monitoring Camera (aka the “Mars Webcam”). The camera is a simple low-resolution device, without a shade to cut down sun glare, and the result isn’t exactly a National Geographic cover photo. But still, it’s the Earth from Mars. That never stops being cool.

Our planet from another planet. That never ceases to excite me.

ohstarstuff:

The Colorful Demise of a Sun-like Star
This Hubble Space Telescope image shows planetary nebula NGC 2440 with a star very similar to our Sun reaching the end of its life. The star is casting off its outer layers of gas, which formed a cocoon around the star’s remaining core. Ultraviolet light from the dying star makes the material glow. The burned-out star, called a white dwarf, is the white dot in the center. The white dwarf is one of the hottest known, with a surface temperature of nearly 400,000 degrees Fahrenheit (200,000 degrees Celsius). The nebula’s chaotic structure suggests that the star shed its mass episodically. During each outburst, the star expelled material in a different direction. This can be seen in the two bow tie-shaped lobes. Our Sun will eventually burn out and shroud itself with stellar debris as well, but luckily not for another 5 billion years. 
(Credit: NASA, ESA, and K. Noll (STScI)

ohstarstuff:

The Colorful Demise of a Sun-like Star


This Hubble Space Telescope image shows planetary nebula NGC 2440 with a star very similar to our Sun reaching the end of its life. The star is casting off its outer layers of gas, which formed a cocoon around the star’s remaining core. Ultraviolet light from the dying star makes the material glow. The burned-out star, called a white dwarf, is the white dot in the center. The white dwarf is one of the hottest known, with a surface temperature of nearly 400,000 degrees Fahrenheit (200,000 degrees Celsius).

The nebula’s chaotic structure suggests that the star shed its mass episodically. During each outburst, the star expelled material in a different direction. This can be seen in the two bow tie-shaped lobes. Our Sun will eventually burn out and shroud itself with stellar debris as well, but luckily not for another 5 billion years.

(Credit: NASA, ESA, and K. Noll (STScI)

(Source: hubblesite.org)

nasa-ismy-truelove:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Scientists from MIT Developed a Trillion frames per second slow motion camera that can show light moving through a bottle. Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography - For comparison, the imaging of a bullet captured at this many frames per second would last a year as explained in thepresentation by Professor Ramesh Raskar of MIT.
[video]
^ what you have witnessed above is light travelling in slow motion.

OOOOOOOOOH MY GOD

nasa-ismy-truelove:

trigonometry-is-my-bitch:

Scientists from MIT Developed a Trillion frames per second slow motion camera that can show light moving through a bottle. Ramesh Raskar presents femto-photography - For comparison, the imaging of a bullet captured at this many frames per second would last a year as explained in thepresentation by Professor Ramesh Raskar of MIT.

[video]

^ what you have witnessed above is light travelling in slow motion.

OOOOOOOOOH MY GOD

distant-traveller:

The Horsehead nebula from blue to infrared

One of the most identifiable nebulae in the sky, the Horsehead Nebula in Orion, is part of a large, dark, molecular cloud. Also known as Barnard 33, the unusual shape was first discovered on aphotographic plate in the late 1800s. The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead’s neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula’s base are young stars just in the process of forming. Light takes about 1,500 years to reach us from the Horsehead Nebula. The above image is a digital combination of images taken in blue, green, red, and hydrogen-alpha light from the Argentina, and an image taken in infrared light by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.

Image credit & copyright: Optical: Aldo Mottino & Carlos Colazo, OAC, Córdoba; Infrared: Hubble Legacy Archive

distant-traveller:

The Horsehead nebula from blue to infrared

One of the most identifiable nebulae in the sky, the Horsehead Nebula in Orion, is part of a large, dark, molecular cloud. Also known as Barnard 33, the unusual shape was first discovered on aphotographic plate in the late 1800s. The red glow originates from hydrogen gas predominantly behind the nebula, ionized by the nearby bright star Sigma Orionis. The darkness of the Horsehead is caused mostly by thick dust, although the lower part of the Horsehead’s neck casts a shadow to the left. Streams of gas leaving the nebula are funneled by a strong magnetic field. Bright spots in the Horsehead Nebula’s base are young stars just in the process of forming. Light takes about 1,500 years to reach us from the Horsehead Nebula. The above image is a digital combination of images taken in blue, green, red, and hydrogen-alpha light from the Argentina, and an image taken in infrared light by the orbiting Hubble Space Telescope.

Image credit & copyright: Optical: Aldo Mottino & Carlos Colazo, OAC, Córdoba; Infrared: Hubble Legacy Archive

(Source: apod.nasa.gov)

8bitfuture:

Lunar transit, captured from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.
On July 26, 2014, the moon crossed between NASA’s SDO and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.

8bitfuture:

Lunar transit, captured from NASA’s Solar Dynamics Observatory.

On July 26, 2014, the moon crossed between NASA’s SDO and the sun, a phenomenon called a lunar transit. This happens approximately twice a year, causing a partial solar eclipse that can only be seen from SDO’s point of view. Images of the eclipse show a crisp lunar horizon, because the moon has no atmosphere that would distort light.

By blending different SDO wavelengths, we can get an enhanced image of the sun. The left image was taken in 304 wavelength, the middle in 171 wavelength, and the right shows the blended result.

(Source: nasa.gov)