Science. Music. More languages than are really necessary. Ranting. Also cats and self-deprecation.

 

astronomicalwonders:

ALMA under the MilkyWay
This view shows several of the ALMA antennas and the central regions of the Milky Way above. In this wide field view, the zodiacal light is seen upper left and at lower left Mars is seen. Saturn is a bit higher in the sky towards the centre of the image. 
Credit: ESO/B. Tafreshi (twanight.org)

astronomicalwonders:

ALMA under the MilkyWay

This view shows several of the ALMA antennas and the central regions of the Milky Way above. In this wide field view, the zodiacal light is seen upper left and at lower left Mars is seen. Saturn is a bit higher in the sky towards the centre of the image. 

Credit: ESO/B. Tafreshi (twanight.org)

theskylightsupforyou:

A Persistent Electrical Storm on SaturnCredit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASATo find out more, visit: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080505.html

theskylightsupforyou:

A Persistent Electrical Storm on Saturn
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA
To find out more, visit: http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/ap080505.html

spacettf:

The Dawn Sky featuring The Moon, Venus, Mercury, The Pleiades, Aldeberan, Sirius, Rigel and Betelgeuse - July 24, 2014 by Joseph Brimacombe on Flickr.
Tramite Flickr: Taken from Coral Towers Observatory at 0622 local time using a modified Canon 5D and 15-mm lens. Three exposures. NOTE The key astronomical objects have been exaggerated for effect. The very bright object mid-image is the moon. Venus is below the moon. Mercury is below and to the right of Venus and just above the cloud line. The open cluster in the upper left is the Pleiades. The star to the right and below the Pleiades is Aldeberan. The four corner stars of Orion to the right of Aldeberan from top in clockwise sequence are: Rigel, Salph, Betelgeuse and Bellatrix. The star on the extreme right is Sirius.

spacettf:

The Dawn Sky featuring The Moon, Venus, Mercury, The Pleiades, Aldeberan, Sirius, Rigel and Betelgeuse - July 24, 2014 by Joseph Brimacombe on Flickr.

Tramite Flickr:
Taken from Coral Towers Observatory at 0622 local time using a modified Canon 5D and 15-mm lens.
Three exposures.
NOTE
The key astronomical objects have been exaggerated for effect.
The very bright object mid-image is the moon. Venus is below the moon. Mercury is below and to the right of Venus and just above the cloud line. The open cluster in the upper left is the Pleiades. The star to the right and below the Pleiades is Aldeberan. The four corner stars of Orion to the right of Aldeberan from top in clockwise sequence are: Rigel, Salph, Betelgeuse and Bellatrix. The star on the extreme right is Sirius.

the-actual-universe:

Astronomers Find Oldest Exoplanet Yet, With A BonusWith the boom of exoplanet discoveries lately, astronomers have seen a lot more of our stellar neighborhood than ever before on their quest to find habitable planets at the right distance from their host stars. Here recently, one such a planet has caught their attention. A group of planets about 13 light-years away orbiting a red dwarf called Kapteyn’s Star have a planet among them in the Goldilocks zone called Kapteyn b.Kapteyn b isn’t just captivating because of its distance from Kapteyn’s Star, but it’s also the oldest exoplanet yet discovered by astronomers. At 11.5 billion years old, it’s just a couple billion years younger than the universe itself. This also makes it over twice the Earth’s age, and being in the habitable zone, as ever it intrigues scientists all the more."It does make you wonder what kind of life could have evolved on those planets over such a long time," said study lead author Guillem Anglada-Escude of Queen Mary University of London.During the observation of Kapteyn’s Star, astronomers noticed a slight color shift in the light being emmitted. This indicated to them that there could possibly be a planet or planets that were gravitationally pulling on the star. After the HARPS spectrometer made the initial discovery, Keck’s HIRES and Chile’s Magellan II’s PFS instrument were able to confirm the findings. It was hard to accept, though, because habitable planets aren’t expected around a red dwarf, especially one that’s only one third the mass of our Sun."We were surprised to find planets orbiting Kapteyn’s Star. Previous data showed some moderate excess of variability, so we were looking for very short-period planets when the new signals showed up loud and clear," said Anglada-Escude.Kapteyn b has a 48 day orbital period where its colder neighbor, Kapteyn c, has a 121 day orbit. So how does an 11.5 billion year old planetary system show up in our galaxy?Astronomers believe that the Kapteyn system was once part of a dwarf galaxy that was assimilated by our Milky Way and has now likely taken its new identity as the Omega Centauri globular cluster 16,000 light years away. They believe this because Omega Centauri contains many thousands of stars that are around the 11.5 billion year age range.-TAZIMAGE CREDIT: PHL @ UPR Arecibo, Aladin Sky Atlas (artistic rendition)SOURCE

the-actual-universe:

Astronomers Find Oldest Exoplanet Yet, With A Bonus

With the boom of exoplanet discoveries lately, astronomers have seen a lot more of our stellar neighborhood than ever before on their quest to find habitable planets at the right distance from their host stars. Here recently, one such a planet has caught their attention. A group of planets about 13 light-years away orbiting a red dwarf called Kapteyn’s Star have a planet among them in the Goldilocks zone called Kapteyn b.

Kapteyn b isn’t just captivating because of its distance from Kapteyn’s Star, but it’s also the oldest exoplanet yet discovered by astronomers. At 11.5 billion years old, it’s just a couple billion years younger than the universe itself. This also makes it over twice the Earth’s age, and being in the habitable zone, as ever it intrigues scientists all the more.

"It does make you wonder what kind of life could have evolved on those planets over such a long time," said study lead author Guillem Anglada-Escude of Queen Mary University of London.

During the observation of Kapteyn’s Star, astronomers noticed a slight color shift in the light being emmitted. This indicated to them that there could possibly be a planet or planets that were gravitationally pulling on the star. After the HARPS spectrometer made the initial discovery, Keck’s HIRES and Chile’s Magellan II’s PFS instrument were able to confirm the findings. It was hard to accept, though, because habitable planets aren’t expected around a red dwarf, especially one that’s only one third the mass of our Sun.

"We were surprised to find planets orbiting Kapteyn’s Star. Previous data showed some moderate excess of variability, so we were looking for very short-period planets when the new signals showed up loud and clear," said Anglada-Escude.
Kapteyn b has a 48 day orbital period where its colder neighbor, Kapteyn c, has a 121 day orbit. So how does an 11.5 billion year old planetary system show up in our galaxy?

Astronomers believe that the Kapteyn system was once part of a dwarf galaxy that was assimilated by our Milky Way and has now likely taken its new identity as the Omega Centauri globular cluster 16,000 light years away. They believe this because Omega Centauri contains many thousands of stars that are around the 11.5 billion year age range.

-TAZ

IMAGE CREDIT: PHL @ UPR Arecibo, Aladin Sky Atlas (artistic rendition)
SOURCE

(Source: facebook.com)